“He that would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.

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Copyright 2019 by Joyce Huntington.  All Rights Reserved. 
Website by Monte Blanco Design 

wHAT TO SEE 

Going Down Jericho Road

Memphis, Tennessee loves Elvis Presley. It should - keeping the King alive is great for the city. So there's a lot to see. Many of the places Elvis lived, worked and performed are preserved. However - some have changed or disappeared but markers remind  Elvis fans what those places once were. I've tracked them all but listed here the most interesting stops.

Lorraine Motel

450 Mulberry St

Memphis, Tennessee 38103

 

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“For Walter Bailey, who co-owned the Lorraine Motel with his wife Lorene, King’s death took a heavy personal toll. He and his wife had done everything together to make a living; he had once been a Pullman porter, and they had once tried running a turkey farm. Then they bought a motel and named it after Lorene (though they spelled the name differently), creating an informal, homey atmosphere enjoyed by black entertainers such as B. B. King, the Mighty Clouds of Joy, the Staple Singers, and others. “In your business you gotta be one big family, and a city has gotta be one big family,” he believed. “I don’t think we’ll make it in the world, if we don’t get together and make it one big family.”  Chapter 19

 

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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rooming

House

Elvis Presley Blvd, Memphis, TENESSEE  38116

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“Some of the police circled around toward the front and back of a two-story brick rooming house that fronted on Main Street and stood directly across from the Lorraine Motel. By 6:06, a police dispatcher sent out a radio communication that the shot had come from the rooming house, and he ordered officers to seal off the whole area. By 6:07, a rifle had been found in a bundle in front of Canipe’s Amusement Company, next to the rooming house. A witness said a white man had left it there.” Chapter  19

 

In Real Life:

 

 

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FIRE 

STATION

NUMBER 2

422 1/2 South Main STREET  

Memphis, TennESSEE 38116

 

 

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“Beyond the cocoon of fellowship at the Lorraine, the area swarmed with police, FBI, and military intelligence (MID) agents. The Memphis Police and Sheriff’s Department had nine tactical units—each consisting of three cars and twelve officers—sited at key locations around the city. An additional ten regular police cars, with three to four men per car, cruised the downtown area, and the FBI had numerous agents working out of its Memphis office. Robert Jensen directed FBI surveillance, while black MPD detectives Redditt and Richmond kept watch on King all day through a small hole in newspaper plastered over the window of Fire Station Number Two, across from the Lorraine. Not exactly a high-tech surveillance operation, this more closely resembled the old-fashioned work of Boss Crump’s snitch."  Chapter 18

 

In Real Life:      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mason temple

930 Mason St

mEMPHIS, tENNESSEE

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“True to form, King electrified and uplifted his audience, overpowering the winds and rain pounding the roof of Mason Temple and the lightning crackling outside. Shouts and applause had continually punctuated his speech as King took himself and his audience beyond the petty tyrannies with which they lived day in and day out. People had been maced by the police, children were hungry, students had walked out of school—but together they formed a vision of a different kind of life and a different relationship among people. People may be poor, they may be tired, King told them, “but whenever men and women straighten their backs up, they’re going somewhere. Because a man can’t ride your back unless it is bent.” That standing up could only be done together.” Chapter 18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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clayborn temple

294 Hernando Street

Memphis, Tennessee 38126

901-322-8745

In Going Down Jericho Road: 

 

“MARCHERS BEGAN TO ASSEMBLE OUTSIDE CLAYBORN Temple as early as 8 AM on Thursday, March 28, buoyed by a massive leafleting and word-of-mouth campaign. The temperature was sixty-one degrees and climbing, a clear day, the sun beating down. The heat reflected from pavement and sidewalks; downtown would soon be stifling. Yet, as strikers and their families and supporters gathered, expecting King at 10 AM, their mood was festive. This was the big day. Ten to twenty thousand marchers would show Mayor Loeb the power of a united black community allied with unions, students, and people of goodwill, white and black. Hundreds of workers carried placards reading, “I Am A Man.” No one expected trouble. Eleven incidents of vandalism had occurred during the night, but this had become normal.”  Chapter 15

 

In Real Life: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Don’t be fooled:  There are a few Lansky's but the one Elvis went to was on Beale Street.

 

city

hall

125 N Main Street Memphis, Tennessee 38103

 

In Going Down Jericho Road: 

 

“Marchers encircled city hall and sang, “We Shall Overcome,” ending with shouts of “Freedom!” Marchers hoped to produce a cascading series of arrests, but the police did nothing, only leaving Reverend Malcolm Blackburn to say that they would march again and again until justice was done. They marched back through the downtown, accompanied by sixty police officers, and when students turned off Main Street and onto Beale, several of them kicked overflowing garbage cans into the street. Still, police officers did nothing, knowing from past experience that arresting students would only produce sympathy in the black community and expand the movement.”  Chapter 12

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

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beale sTREET

Memphis, Tennessee 38105

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

“Elsewhere, Reverend Starks had been getting people to move back, when policemen charged into them. Reporters taking pictures especially enraged the police. Whittier Sengstacke, who had been maced on February 23, witnessed police opening up with tear-gas shells and running at the crowd of 

marchers, swinging their clubs wildly. When Sengstacke identified himself as a reporter, one officer squirted mace into his eyes and another attempted a smashing blow to the back of his head but missed. A white TV cameraman who had filmed a sheriff beating a black man was backhanded with a police club so hard that it sent him through a broken window. Stumbling around Beale Street through a fog of mace, Sengstacke said, “I saw women, young children and citizens of all age groups fleeing in terror in front of the officers.”  Chapter 15

 

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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lANSKY

bros.

 

149 Union Ave, Memphis, TN 38103

 

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

“Reporter Clark Porteous had covered Ole Miss in 1962, where white rioters had killed two people in their efforts to stop James Meredith from registering for classes. Porteous began the day watching thousands peacefully carrying “I Am A Man” placards and chanting, “Loeb must go, Loeb must go,” but soon Beale Street looked “like a battlefield.” New suits and fixtures in front of Paul’s Tailoring, dummies from Lansky’s, and goods from Schwab’s Sundries and Harris Department Store all lay scattered on Beale, and at Willie’s Drive-In on Linden, a looter handed out liquor. Police tear-gas bombs caused a woman to collapse, and the fumes forced the police to turn back until they could get more gas masks. Incredibly, Porteous wrote, “I didn’t see any police brutality. Many of the officers were taking a lot, and doing it bravely.”​  Chapter 15 

 

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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peabody hotel

118 S 2nd Street

Memphis, Tennessee 38103

901-529-4000

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“King’s lieutenant Bernard Lee flagged down two black women in a white Pontiac, and the driver let Lee take the wheel while King, Abernathy, and two other unidentified black men got in the back. At McCall and Front Street, about fifty people who had broken away from the march surrounded the car, and they could go no further. Lee asked motorcycle cop Lieutenant Nichols to get them to the Peabody Hotel, where AFSCME had a suite of rooms, but Nichols said the rioting made it impossible. “Just get us away from trouble,” Lee said. Joined by three motorcycle cops sent by Police Chief MacDonald, Nichols escorted King to the Holiday Inn Rivermont. Nichols himself checked King, Abernathy, Lee, and the two others into Room 801, a suite at the hotel, and then remained in the lobby after they went to their rooms. Lieutenant Nichols had no desire to make a martyr of King, but that didn’t mean he respected him. Nichols disparagingly told the MPD’s Arkin that King’s “only concern was to run and to protect himself.”​  Chapter 15

 

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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four way BBQ

308 Poplar Ave

 Memphis, TENNESSEE 38105

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“Rustin disparaged what he considered Black Power’s cultural distractions. In New York City, he said, “Nothing’s happening” because African Americans kept struggling over hairstyles or whether to use the name “Negro,” “Black,” or “colored”—or debating what is or is not soul food. By contrast, “In Memphis there is a real fight going on. Here people have a fight on your hands and don’t have time for this foolishness.” He drew his heaviest applause when he likened the Memphis fight to the Montgomery movement and called the Memphis strike “one of the great struggles for the emancipation of the black man today.”  Chapter 12

In Real Life:

Michael Honey did not mention the Four Way in Going Down Jericho Road, but he might have.  The Four Way claims Dr. King ate there and loved the catfish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MISS girlie SOUL FOOD

629 Chelsea Ave

 Memphis, TENNESSEE 38107

901-522-8778

 

FIRESTONE 

1914 Poplar Ave  Memphis, Tennessee 38104

 

In Going Down Jericho Road:

 

“For Memphis sanitation workers, the meaning of 1968 and King’s sacrifice remained clear. Striker Willie Sain, who later became a minister himself, said King came almost as an emissary from God, a Moses figure who enabled the workers and their allies to win. King broke the media blackout of the strike, energized the community, and came into a new role as a labor leader that he played to perfection.”  Chapter 20

In Real Life: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In Last Train to Memphis:

 

“We were all scared to death,” said Scotty. “Here we come with two little funky instruments and a whole park full of people, and Elvis, instead of just standing flat-footed and tapping his foot, well, he was kind of jiggling. That was just his way of tapping his foot. Plus I think with those old loose britches that we wore—they weren’t pegged, they had lots of material and pleated fronts—you shook your leg, and it made it look like all hell was going on under there. During the instrumental parts he would back off from the mike and be playing and shaking, and the crowd would just go wild, but he thought they were actually making fun of him.”
He sang his second song, “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” which pretty much exhausted the group’s repertoire at this point, and the crowd went even wilder. Bill clowned and rode his bass, gave ever more confident whoops in the background, and hit his instrument a double lick. “It was really a wild sound, like a jungle drum or something,” Elvis recalled with some wonder. “I came offstage, and my manager told me that they was hollering because I was wiggling my legs. I went back out for “an encore, and I did a little more, and the more I did, the wilder they went.”


Sam Phillips and Bob Neal stood watching from the wings. This was something beyond either of their wildest expectations. As Elvis sang “Blue Moon of Kentucky” again, for his encore, he showed even greater confidence and more untrammeled movement. “It was a real eye-opener,” said Neal, who had had no reason to expect anything whatsoever of this untried, unproven nineteen-year-old. “He just automatically did things right.”  Page i224

 

In Real Life:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mckellar lake

Mckellar lAKE

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 

 

In Last Train to Memphis:

 

“Starting in April they began to go out to Riverside Park every week, two or three times a week, whenever it was warm enough. Sometimes on the weekends they would eat fried chicken on the bluff; McKellar Lake was full of boaters and water-skiers and young couples just having a good time. More often than not, they would double-date with Elvis’ cousin Gene, who was going out off and on with Dixie’s sister Juanita. Elvis and Gene were goofy together—they acted as if they had some kind of joke going on between them all the time, speaking in a kind of private language that no one else could understand, laughing at things that weren’t funny to anyone else.”​  Page i162

 

In Real Life:

 

 

MUD ISLAND 

Island DrIVE

Memphis, TENNESSEE 38103

 

In Last Train to Memphis:

 

“Over the next two days he showed June a month’s worth of Memphis sights—he took her by Humes, stopped by the Memphis Recording Service, went up to the Hotel Chisca, where he introduced her to Dewey, showed her the Courts where he had grown up, and Crown Electric across the street, with the truck he had driven sitting out in the yard. He introduced her to Bernard and Guy Lansky and bought her a motorcycle cap just like his. Then they went out to Mud Island, where he drove his motorcycle so fast that they both got scared, and he made her put her hand on his chest so that she could feel his heart pounding. ”   Page i570

 

In Real Life:

 

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 Elvis Presley

BIRTHPLACE

306 Elvis Presley DrIVE

 Tupelo, MISSISSIPPI 38801

 

In Last Train to Memphis:

 

“Mayday, mayday, mayday, the call sounded, jerking the radioman alert.  He glanced at his console, where two green lights were pulsing.  The call was coming in through both Heceta Head and Umpqua Lighthouse, putting the source of the mayday somewhere between the two— the waters west of the dunes.”  Page 164

 

In Real Life:

 

So here’s the thing. I don’t ever really need a reason to go to a lighthouse but having a reason – like that Bonnie Henderson talks about Umpqua Lighthouse in Strand – is pretty cool. Umpqua plays a minor role in the book – a mayday call bounced through the lighthouse telling a radioman where a boat had run aground. It was a call from the fishing boat – the Senak – which touched off the hair-raising rescue operation right off the coast of Mile 157. I drove up to the lighthouse with my husband. As lighthouses go – it’s a little different. It’s not poking out into the ocean on a point – it’s nestled in the dunes – in fact, a pretty wide swath of dunes lie between the lighthouse and water. There’s a reason for that – the first lighthouse which sat at the mouth of the Umpqua flooded so often it collapsed. The new light – well, newish – was lit in 1894 and it sits in a little Oregon State Park which is overflowing with information. We spotted a marker facing the water – we can never resist those. It talks about whales on that stretch of coastline.

 

Up the road, a little is a museum which walks through the history of those parts. I was surprised that Strand, wasn’t in the shop – the museum keeper hadn’t heard of it but she said she might get some copies so it could be there when you arrive. There’s also a campground just around the bend – and if you want to make me jealous you can camp there like I never did – in fact – get the yurt. The interesting thing about the two lighthouses Henderson talks about – Umpqua and Heceta – is that they’re sister lighthouses, built by the same basic plan. Since the second rendition went up, the Umpqua light has been – without interruption – guiding sailors traveling along the Oregon Coast .

In Last Train to Memphis:

 

 

“Gladys had a difficult pregnancy and toward the end had to quit her job at the Garment Plant. When she came to term, Vernon’s mother, Minnie, a midwife named Edna Martin, and one other woman attended her until the midwife called the doctor, sixty-eight-year-old William Robert Hunt. At about four in the morning of January 8, he delivered a baby, stillborn, then thirty-five minutes later another boy. The twins were named Jesse Garon and Elvis Aron, with the rhyming middle names intended to match. Aron (pronounced with a long a and the emphasis on the first syllable) was for Vernon’s friend Aaron Kennedy, Elvis was Vernon’s middle name, and Jesse, of course, was for his father. The dead twin was buried in an unmarked grave in Priceville Cemetery, just below Old Saltillo Road, and was never forgotten either in the legend that accompanied his celebrated younger brother or in family memory. As a child Elvis was said to have frequently visited his brother’s grave; as an adult he referred to his twin again and again, reinforced by Gladys’ belief that “when one twin died, the one that lived got all the strength of both.” Shortly[…]” Page i32

 

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Assembly of God Church 

94-132 Elvis Presley Dr

 Tupelo, MS 38804

 

In Last Train to Memphis:

 

“In 1937 Gladys’ uncle Gains became sole preacher at the Assembly of God Church, which was now housed in a modest wood-framed structure on Adams Street built primarily by Gains. Many in the tiny congregation later recalled a very young Elvis Presley throwing himself into the hymn singing with abandon, and Gladys liked to tell how “when Elvis was just a little fellow, not more than two years old, he would slide down off my lap, run into the aisle and scramble up to the platform. There he would stand looking at the choir and trying to sing with them. He was too little to know the words… but he could carry the tune and he would watch their faces and try to do as they did.” Page i793

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Postscript 

It's a pity. These locations no longer exist.. 

Robilo's Restaurant

Loeb's BBQ

Harlem House

Big M's

Holiday Inn Rivermark

New Rebel Motel